Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Cream Biscuits {Only 2 Ingredients!}



Some of y'all might remember reading my post last week about my trip to Nashville for the Southern Baking Retreat.  It was such an amazing trip in so many ways.
But one of the best parts of the trips was we got to make biscuits.
I mean, who doesn't love a good homemade biscuit?  There's nothing like 'em!
One of the things we learned is how many ways there are to make biscuits.
Using just a few ingredients, you can change up the shape and flavor of the humble biscuit.
One of my favorite biscuits that we made that day is the one I'm going to share with you today. This is the biscuit that me and my baking buddy, Brenda from A Farm Girl's Dabbles, were given as our biscuit task for that day. Brenda had never made biscuits before. But you would never know it.  She couldn't believe how good these turned out - on her first attempt ever!  That's how easy and amazingly delicious these biscuits are.
Biscuits are intimidating to make for many folks, but they really shouldn't be
This recipe along with White Lily Self-Rising flour make it a lot less intimidating for the new or frustrated biscuit maker.  Baking does not come naturally to me, so I tell you this, if I can do it, anyone can do it.  This is what makes this biscuit turn out perfect every time.

I am not doing anything special to make these biscuits look beautiful for these photos, it really is the flour!  My friend Tina, from Mommy's Kitchen, swears by this flour so much that she orders it online from Amazon because she can't get it in her local store yet. So, if you can't find it in a store near you, there are other ways to get it. And did I mention it makes the most beautiful pancakes too?  You have to feel this stuff to really appreciate how special it is. 
It just feels so silky smooth.

So, what's the difference between self-rising and all-purpose flour?
Self-Rising flour already has the leavening agent (baking powder) and salt added in the flour mixture.  First off, let's start with the most common complaint any new biscuit maker has.

"Every time I make biscuits, they turn out as hard as bricks."

I hear this one a lot! We all know biscuits shouldn't be hard.
So, what could possibly be the problem?

 You forgot to add a leavening agent (like baking powder).
When using all-purpose flour to make biscuits, you have to add some sort of leavening agent to get your dough to rise when baking.  But, when you use self-rising flour, it already has the leavening added so you don't have to worry about adding in baking powder or salt. And I'm telling you, this White Lily Self-Rising flour is better than any other Self-Rising flour on the market (and I'm not getting paid to say that either). It makes all the difference!

Your baking powder has expired.
If you are using a recipe that calls for all-purpose flour and baking powder, then perhaps it's the baking powder that is the problem.  This is actually pretty common. Always check the expiration date on your can or box before baking. You'd be surprised how long that stuff sits in your pantry.  Also, put a small bit on your tongue. It should taste metallic and almost "zing" your tongue.  But once again, if using self-rising flour, it already has baking powder added so no need to worry about this.

You messed with the dough way too much.
We ain't making bread here.
Biscuit dough (unlike bread dough) does not like to be handled and kneaded a lot.
 A couple of folds and then cut them out. That's it.
You do not knead the dough until smooth and elastic, like you would bread.
You measured too much flour without realizing it.
Some folks pack their measuring cups when measuring flour.  I used to do this too.
It's a common mistake.  And then you wonder why the mixture isn't coming together like it should. Do. Not. Pack. This goes for any kind of baking you are doing.
This isn't like measuring brown sugar. You do not pack the cup.
And it's for this reason, I do not measure directly from the flour bag.
When you scoop directly from the flour bag, you tend to pack the flour in the cup and that will result in too much flour in your batter.  The best way to measure flour is to have the flour in a bowl or a flour canister where there is plenty of room to work. I give the flour a good stir first with a fork. This loosens it up a bit and helps stir a little bit of air in there.  Then I dip my measuring cup in the flour and scoop off any excess flour.  No packing. Just dip and scoop off excess. Either using your finger or a butter knife.
You are using the wrong cup to measure.
There are cups for measuring dry ingredients and there are ones for measuring liquid ingredients.  Don't try to scoop flour into a liquid measuring cup. And don't try to measure liquid in a dry ingredient cup.  It just doesn't measure the same.  
Experienced biscuit makers know what a good biscuit dough should feel like.
So many of them know if they have too much flour or too little flour in a dough and can add more until it's the right consistency. But until you get to that point, make sure you are 
using the right cups. This tip goes for all your baking recipes.
You tried to change the fat content. 
Changing out ingredients could mess up the recipe entirely.
If a recipe calls specifically for butter - use real butter. Not margarine. Not oil.
If a recipe calls for heavy cream, use heavy cream, not milk.
If a baking recipe calls for milk, don't use skim milk.
2% or higher milk fat is always best. 
If a recipe calls for buttermilk, use real buttermilk. 
You can make a buttermilk substitute most times with a bit of whole milk and lemon juice or vinegar (here's another case where you should never use skim or low fat milk). Buttermilk is thick. And some recipes require that thickness. So if your buttermilk substitute is not thickened, it may not work in your recipe. There is a buttermilk powder on the market. It works fine, but honestly, nothing tastes quite like good, real buttermilk to me. 
But the powder usually works in a pinch.
Fat is needed in most baking recipes for a reason so keep it there unless the recipe creator has given instructions that a substitute can be used.

And another mention of note when making biscuits:
DO NOT TWIST YOUR BISCUIT CUTTER.
When you press into the biscuit dough, push straight down and pull up.
Do not twist the biscuit cutter in the dough.
Twisting it seals the edges off and will keep your biscuit from rising.
Resist the twist!!

Ok, so having gone through all that, let's make some biscuits.
I promise, you got this. Your family will go nuts for these!
And only 2 ingredients. Yep, just 2 (and a little melted butter). 
Ingredients:
1 3/4 cups White Lily Self-Rising flour
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup melted butter (for tops of biscuits)
Directions:
Preheat oven to 500F degrees.
Spray a baking sheet with a little nonstick spray.
Measure out flour (using technique above) into a large bowl.
Gradually stir in cream, adding enough to moisten flour to a sticky dough.
Mix gently then turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface (use the self-rising flour).
If it is too sticky to handle, add just a sprinkling of self-rising flour to the top.
Fold the dough two times to form a ball.
Pat or roll dough gently to a 1/2 inch thickness.
You'll notice, it's not rolled out into a big sheet. 
I just pressed it out gently with my hands, leaving the dough fairly thick.
 
Take your biscuit cutter and dip it in a bit of the self-rising flour (this will keep it from sticking to the dough as it cuts). Then begin to cut out biscuits as close together as possible.
Do not twist your biscuit cutter when cutting them out. Just press down, and pull up.
I got about 3 biscuits from this first cutting. I probably could have cut out 4.
Then I rolled the dough back up and spread it out again. Then did a second cutting. 
Don't cut the dough more than twice.
The dough starts to get tough after that and it changes the texture. So two cuttings will be the maximum for these biscuits. I get 6 biscuits from this recipe.  
Place biscuits on your prepared cookie sheet.
Note: Place biscuits close to each other (with sides touching) for soft biscuit sides.
Separate biscuits if you want a biscuit with slightly crisper sides.
Brush the tops of the biscuits with a bit of melted butter.
Note: Little hands love to help make biscuits!
Then place biscuits (one sheet at a time, in the middle rack) in preheated oven and bake for about 8-10 minutes or until tops are golden brown. 
I love how these biscuits separate just a bit in the middle. It makes them easy to split.
Brush tops of biscuits with a little more melted butter and serve while warm.
And then put a little more butter on the insides if you'd like too.
I'm telling ya, these biscuits are so fluffy and beautiful.
No one can resist them!
I gotta say, there is something so relaxing and pleasing about making a good biscuit.  
 Just looking at the counter I made those biscuits on makes me happy.
If you follow these few suggestions here, I promise you will have a beautiful, fluffy and amazing tasting biscuit. If you can get your hands on some White Lily Self-Rising flour, then I know you will never go back to using anything else again because everyone will be so impressed by your soft and fluffy biscuits.  Southern bakers swear by this flour for a reason.

Here are some additional tips from White Lily:
TIPBiscuit dough does not need to be kneaded except just to form a ball. A few gentle folds is enough. It is a common mistake in biscuit making to overhandle the dough.
TIPTO STORE: Cool biscuits completely. Wrap in plastic wrap or place in freezer storage containers. Biscuits can be frozen for up to one month. To reheat: Place biscuits on baking pan and bake 5 to 10 minutes at 400°F. Refrigeration is not recommended.

Enjoy!





Note: This was not a sponsored post. I just really love this flour. 
However,  if you order using any of the Amazon links above, I do make a very teeny tiny 
commission off that sale.  




91 comments:

I Play Outside The Box said...

I rarely make biscuits anymore...but I will be trying this recipe...my husband will be thrilled again! :-)

Anonymous said...

sooooooooo preheat the oven to 500 degrees??? is that correct??? Can't wait to make these!!!

K Little @Cooking with K said...

Look at those biscuits....they are beautiful Brandie! Makes me want to make some for breakfast! Have to make them early in the morning here in Texas. The temperatures are in the upper 90's and 100's, but that doesn't keep me from baking when you know you are having these :)

K Little @Cooking with K said...

Meant to say I ordered my White Lily flower after seeing your post...there you go...I'm ready to make some!

Brandi said...

Great recipe, Brandie! I found homemade biscuits to be so intimidating. Your post makes them seem much easier.

Brandie S. said...

That is correct! Have fun making these! :)

Brandie S. said...

You won't regret it Kay! I just know you are going to love it!!

Brandie S. said...

This recipe will make biscuit making fun again. I love biscuits any way I can get them but my hubby says these are his absolute favorite and really they couldn't be easier to make. Good one to make with kids!

Brandie S. said...

You can do this Brandi! Just a few basic techniques like I mentioned above and you can do these easily. If you have any questions, just let me know :)

Glenda said...

I grew up with White Lily Flour, and at the age of 70, I am not likely to change!! It used to be made in a nearby town, but was sold several years ago and is now made elsewhere. The quality is still the same, though, and I've tried some less expensive products, only to return to White Lily. Happy to say that my daughter has the same loyalty! I'll try this recipe, for sure! Oh, and White Lily used to make THE BEST muffin mixes in pouches, but the new company stopped making those, and I still miss them. Martha White is not bad, but just is not the same as White Lily.

Linda D said...

Once you've tried White Lily, no other flour will do! Baked items just do not have the same taste nor texture as White Lily! I must try these soon...Love your site, Brandie!

Pamela @ Brooklyn Farm Girl said...

I just bought White Lily flour last week but haven't tried it yet, glad for these reviews and this post here!

These biscuits are amazing, few ingredients and look at how yummy they are! I need these, asap!

Brandie S. said...

Glenda, I love hearing that. I am well and truly hooked on it now!

Brandie S. said...

Yes! I would totally agree with that. Who knew flour could make so much of a difference? But it really does!

Brandie S. said...

Pamela, you won't be disappointed. I just know you are going to love these :)

Brenda @ a farmgirl's dabbles said...

This was such a blast for me, loved making biscuits and trying out the different kinds! I have been experimenting quite a bit this week with trying to come up with a version for my "Midwest" friends who can't get their hands on White Lily. I'm not there yet. White Lily is definitely some special flour for light and fluffy and flavorful biscuits. I WILL find a way to keep it in my pantry, even if it means ordering it online!

Annie Carhart said...

Thanks for the little tips as a Reminder: DRY ingredient measuring cups, using a Cutter and NOT twisting.
Of course you Must use BUTTER if it's calling for it. Try making what I've called my basic cookie recipe, which is a sort of Shortbread Cookie recipe with margarine instead of butter and you'll notice the Difference. Butter makes your cookies Crisper, so if you like a softer cookie, go with the oleo ;>

Gingerbread Kristy said...

Can you double this recipie? Im going to get some White Lily flour!!! Thanks!!!

Brandie S. said...

You definitely can double this recipe Kristy. Hope you love it. Make sure you come back to let me know how it turned out!

Brandie S. said...

Great tips about the cookies Annie. Thank you!

Marsha Baker said...

What an awesome tutorial Brandie. Your biscuits look tooooo beautiful and inviting! I've been making lots of 7-Up biscuits lately...amazing what ideas folks come up with huh? We don't have this White Lily flour around here, so I will be on the hunt to get some. Thanks much for sharing.

Angie Shawver said...

Really looking forward to trying these, any idea on how they would work with coconut milk ?

Belinda Neukam said...

I have used White Lily Self Rising Flour for years. My grandmother used it and always had the best biscuits.. I use to have trouble finding in it Indiana and I use to go to Ky and get it. Then when I lived in Fl I had trouble finding it for awhile.. Oh I was so glad when the Publix started carrying it.
For the ones who have never used it, you are missing the best biscuits.

Shiloh Barkley said...

Thank you!

Anonymous said...

Those are yummy looking biscuits, Brandi! I was a biscuitmaker for Bojangles for a year and a half so I've made LOTS AND LOTS of biscuits...I even burned a couple of panfuls, too!!

Denise Hollan said...

Brandie you were in my little piece of the world. Hope Nashville made you feel welcome. My Dad taught me how to make biscuits when I was a little girl. And White Lily has been a staple in our home for a long time

Denise Hollan said...

Brandie you were in my little piece of the world. Hope Nashville made you feel welcome. My Dad taught me how to make biscuits when I was a little girl. And White Lily has been a staple in our home for a long time

Lynn said...

Yep...that's how it's done. I'm a Martha White fan but White Lily is a good flour,too and yes the flour matters alot. You did a great tutorial. I set the oven to about 450 degrees. I think the next time I make 'em I'll try it at 500. Thanks for sharing.

Anonymous said...

I'm inspired!! I have wanted to start baking scones again too but thought it too much trouble. I think using the White Lily flour could be worth experimenting with.
Thanks... that trip to nashville sure was worthwhile.

Anonymous said...

Living in the North, I can't get White Lily flour unless I order it on line and at $9.95 a bag it's expensive. Can I use another self rising flour and still get the same wonderful results as you did? My hubby grew up on biscuits and I know that he would sure enjoy these! Thanks for posting this recipe....I so enjoy your newsletters! Carol

Brandie S. said...

Hi Carol! I wish I could tell you that you would get the same results, but really, it's the flour that makes these so special. You can certainly use other self-rising flours and this recipe will still work. But I really recommend the White Lily if you can ever get your hands on it and you'll see the difference :)

Brandie S. said...

Hi Angie, I don't cook or bake with coconut milk so I really couldn't tell you how that would turn out. But I will say that you need heavy cream in this recipe. It's the only one I would use. :)

Brandie S. said...

I completely agree Belinda!

Erin Fike said...

I believe that I will be buying some White Lily flour.....ASAP! These biscuits look amazing.

Tammy E. said...

I just made these wonderful biscuits. I used a stoneware pan and should have baked them another minute or two longer. They looked done, but were a little doughy on the inside. But the flavor and texture were magnificent. Who would have thought heavy cream could make a biscuit this good? White Lily has been my go to flour for 25 years. Thank goodness I can find it easily. Thanks so much for sharing this with us!

P.S. I found a tip online for kneading dough that I thought I'd share. Use a pillowcase. You may have heard of this before, but I had never. I saw it on a video a few months ago. I've always had a hard time with dough being hard to deal with because it is sticky. Since learning to spread flour on a pillowcase and pulling it up around the dough to knead it, my problem has disappeared!

Tammy

jimlwright said...

I used Martha White flour for many years. On a whim, I decided to give White Lily a shot. I never looked at Martha again, bless her heart. Now, I live in Jordan and can't get either one. Not only that, self rising flour is unheard of here! After adjusting to using plain flour, and to the higher altitude, my biscuits are finally good again. This recipe makes me want to dance around the kitchen. I'll definitely be going to the market in the cool of the evening to stock up on some heavy cream. Gawd, I adore biscuits and my Middle Eastern friends have learnt to love them too! Thanks for sharing this recipe!

Crystal said...

I have to say I LOVE this flour. This was the only one that my mom would buy to make biscuits with. She didn't like the biscuits to look yellow like a lot of other flours can produce. I continue that tradition and this is the only flour I buy as well. My hubs says my cat-head biscuits are the best in the whole world.

Jeanne said...

I love this recipe and the amount of detail you had about everything anyone ever needs to know about making biscuits. Wonderful. I am going to feature the biscuits with a link to all your wonderful writing and pics. I am also going to make them!

Kate Collins said...

I will definitely take the time to make these for our special Sunday breakfast. I am from West Virginia, and I learned to cook before I learned to play the piano for Sunday School!!! When I read your blog I feel as if I am sitting down to have a cozy chat with my sister, or a dear friend. Your positive attitude and loving heart are reflected in your writing. Keep Smiling...

I Play Outside The Box said...

I've made quite a few biscuits in my days...but I can say now...that I've never had a better biscuit that these are. My sister and I made them for dinner tonight with some sausage gravy....they were delicious!! This will be my go-to recipe for biscuits from now on! TFS!

Donna Blassingham said...

This is my kind of cooking/baking. Quick, easy and DELICIOUS! Would have never thought they could be this good, light and fluff. This recipe is definitely a KEEPER! I will be making them often. Thanks for sharing.

shelly said...

Wow I have never been able to make these always to dry.I just made them I;m amazed that it was easy that i to could make good biscuits so good wow

KT-1 said...

I make biscuits fairly often ... anxious to give this recipe a try - and I have the PERFECT tomato to slice to go with them...and maybe some country ham and cooked summer apples!

Gloria Bowden said...

I have been making biscuits for going on 52 years now...Don't make as often as use too..I always used self rising flour, and buttermilk.....I"m not sure we can get White lily flour here now, but will sure try, I want to make these...And I have never rolled out my dough and cut it with cutter...I have just always made my little well in flour bowl made from their and pinch then off...This is way I learned to make them...I have made a lot of pans for our bunch at dear camp, they thought they had a gold nugget...These sound so good...Thanks.I will be putting this on my Gloria"s Recipes page...Hope you visit page....

Anonymous said...

Until I found this recipe, the last time I made biscuits was probably about 25 years ago and they turned out like little white hockey pucks so I gave up. I've now made this recipe twice and the flavor is great. First time they tasted good, but crumbly (probably too much flour, and yes I'm using White Lilly). Second time was much better and I think I'm getting the hang of it now. Second time I even dared to make breakfast for MIL (and she makes good biscuits), hubby, son, grand-daughter, and friend, and they all seemed to like them. Mine weren't pretty like yours, but I think with practice they will look better. With just two ingredients they were simple to make and they are really tasty.
Debbie

Anonymous said...

I so agree about the White Lily flour! And not just for baking biscuits either,any baking such as homemade cakes and cookies.I have tried other flours and there is no comparison.

Janey Sczepczenski Wolfe said...

You can buy White Lily at Save-A-Lot food stores if you live in the south, for around $3. I live in Tennessee.

Susie said...

I love your recipes, and these biscuits look delicious! One thing... every time I click on your website, I always get a bunch of pop up ads. I have antiviral protection and pop up blockers, but these still come thru. Do any other of your readers have this problem?

Anonymous said...

The picture of the biscuits look great. Did you cook the biscuits in the picture touching or separated?

Amanda said...

Hey Brandi, any tips or warnings for a non stick pan? I want the kind of pans you show in the pic but don't own any right now I know a spray won't work on them it will just bake on.

Angie Henderson said...

These biscuits are the bees knees. I'll not use any other recipe from now on. I just used generic self rising flour from Wally World, and baked them on a sheet pan covered with a re-usable parchment. Unbelievably easy, and melt in your mouth tender. They went perfectly with our sausage gravy. There hasn't been one thing I've made from your site that hasn't been delicious and a huge hit with my family. It's the first place I stop when I'm planning my meals. Thank you Brandie <3

Brandie S. said...

Angie, what an amazingly sweet comment. Thank you so much for taking the time to tell me that. It just makes all the work worth it to know someone is loving what I'm sharing. I hope you continue to love all the recipes you might try!

Brandie S. said...

Hi Amanda, if you are using nonstick baking pans then just skip the nonstick baking spray step. It'll still come out fine. Or, if you are still concerned they might stick, just put down a layer of parchment paper on your baking sheet. Hope that helps!

Brandie S. said...

I baked them separate. If you like soft edges, bake them together.

Brandie S. said...

Hi Susie! Thank you for letting me know. That problem should be fixed now! :)

Anonymous said...

What would the temperature be for a fan assisted oven? 180 degrees C ?

Pamela S said...

I'm a novice about flour, so does it matter if it's unbleached? Amazon currently has unbleached White Lily self rising flour for a really good price!!! Thanks.

Brandie S. said...

I say if you have found it at a great price, go with it. Some bakers prefer the unbleached. The only difference, the unbleached is a more natural wheat color and some bakers feel this does enhance the taste. Either way, you can't go wrong with the White Lily. Once you open the bag, I recommend putting it in a lidded container. :)

Brandie S. said...

Oh, I wish I could answer your question. I'm so sorry but I don't have a fan assisted oven so I'm really not sure. Perhaps another reader on here has one and can make a recommended baking temperature!

LianaM said...

Brandi - I finally found the White Lilly Flour at my local Kroger store. I live in central Arkansas and found a list of stores that carry this flour on the White Lilly Flour website. Also, I saw that some folks mentioned the cost of ordering the flour online, but the website also has a store, were you can order and their prices were very reasonable, in my opinion.

So, my question is, you mentioned that you also use this flour for pancakes. After searching your blog, I couldn't find the recipe and wondered if you would post this sometime. Thanks for all the great recipes. I will be making my biscuits today. I plan on making a double batch, because good biscuits don't last long at our house!

Joey J said...

holy smokes they look DEELISH and easy lol.thanks!! Love your blog!

I wonder if I can find White Lily flour here in CA though?:( I used to use it in SC and I remember REDBAND lol

Melissa said...

Pardon the stupid question, but I wanted to know if whipping cream would do or is it imperative to use heavy whipping cream? My Tom Thumb was out of it and grabbed the regular just hopi' and a'prayin' it would work. Does anyone know?

Shellie Masini said...

OMG, Brandi!! These biscuits look so good, I am a biscuit addict!! I was on a mission to get White Lily flour as Ive been in Phoenix, Az. for 30+ yrs & people havent even heard of it here! I'm originally from Illinois and I recall my Grand-Mother using White lily flour years ago when I was a kid so I was thrilled to find this recipe...& for the fact that it only takes 2 Ing's! Let me add, someone else mentioned their biscuits turned out like 'Hockey Pucks'..-HA! That would have been a compliment to how mine turned out..lol! ;)
Now, Im going to be honest here...my MIL has the 'feel' for breads, biscuits, baking etc & Ive been determined to at least turn out a decent biscuit since the only help Ive ever gotten from her has been..."I guess you just dont have the feel for baking-..Gee Thanks for the encouragement!!?" (This is my 2nd MIL & Im finding out, she is not a huge fan of mine-her prob..not mine as Ive realized, theres NO pleasing this woman! :-/
My 1st MIL was a blessing from God & truly taught me everything she could about being a good wife, Mother baker, etc!) Anyway, I digress.
I went to Amazon looking for White Lily & knew(or hoped) I could probably beat Amazons price by going straight to the source- Smuckers.com! I just wanted to share with you guys that if you do go to their site & choose from the "Flour & Cornmeal 4 (5 lb) pack" for $16.00 you can then choose ALL flour, you dont have to choose any cornmeal at all! You can mix & match the 4 (5 lb) pack however you want, so I ended up getting 4 bags of Self-Rising flour for $4.00 per bag. Here was the downside-shipping was almost as much as all 4 bags of flour! That was a bit disheartening! Although..Im chomping at the bit to get baking these biscuits, so I ordered & it arrived very quickly! So, with that I have a few questions!
I ran into my local Safeway & all they had for heavy cream was a quart container for $5.39!! Where do you all buy your heavy cream for a more reasonable price? My goodness, that seemed expensive! And, rather than using non-stick baking sheets. Have any of you ever tried baking them in cast iron skillets, generously oiled? I recall my Grand-Mother making them that way & it produced a more crispy edge that was dee-lish!! Just a thought! Question #2, whats the best way to store flour to maintain its freshness? Ive seen some Chef's keep their flour/sugar in large, glass, wide-mouthed containers. How do some of you store (at least) 5 lbs of flour to maintain its freshness? Also, does anyone have anymore similar recipes like this one, including White Lily for pancakes, pie crusts etc? Please share if you do! :)
Lastly,I wanted to let you all know, if anyone does end up going to Smuckers.com...they enclose a coupon for free shipping for your next order...as long as its $75.00 or higher! But, at their prices..it would make sense to stock up! Especially if you saved on shipping!

Brandi, thank you so much for your recipes! Along with so many others..Ive not made one thats turned out wrong or bad-you give me the encouragement & confidence I need in the kitchen even if my MIL doesnt! Losing my Mom at an early age, Ive had to rely on hit & miss recipes and your recipes are definitely Big Time HITS in our home!! Thank you so much for what you do!!(sorry about the length of post-thank you for your patience!)
Happy Biscuit Making & Blessings!

Anonymous said...

Can you bake them at a lower temperature than 500? Our smoke detector goes off if the oven is over 375.

Anonymous said...

What do you do with the leftover dough after you've cut out the biscuits? I realize it would only be a little bit of dough but it would feel like a waste to throw it out...

Anonymous said...

I tried making these, I dont know what Im doing wrong. They dont raise at all, and the bottoms are burned absolutely black. I can't believe you are baking these at 500 degrees. What could I be doing wrong? I bought White Lily flour just to make these, too.

Brandie Skibinski said...

Are you sure you purchased self-rising flour? Sounds like there isn't a leavening agent in your flour. You need to use self-rising only for this. Also, the temperature is correct. It might seem high but it is correct.

Anonymous said...

I tried this recipe, and they are delicious. One problem and question: they rose up nicely but when I removed from the oven in a bit they had sunk down. Still tasted good though. Do yours rise and then fall some as they cool?

Anonymous said...

I just checked, it is indeed White Lilly Self Rising Flour. I used a foil lined pan, would that have caused such a black burned bottom on them? I may try one more time, as I have another cup of heavy cream, but Im really disappointed. I was all ready to enjoy these!

Brandie Skibinski said...

Don't use aluminum foil. Just go by the directions I have here. Aluminum foil works as a heat conductor and therefore is superheating your biscuits way too fast, which is why they are getting so dark on the bottom. Just spray with nonstick cooking spray. And make sure your rack is in the middle of the oven. Also, do not twist your biscuit cutter when cutting down on biscuits. If you see my tutorial above, I show you how to do it. Twisting down on the dough will seal off the edges and won't allow the biscuit to rise. Just push down and pull up. Hope that helps

Anonymous said...

Thanks Brandie for taking the time to help. Im determined to make these work! Okay, I will try a different pan. I just cut them with a knife into squares, I didnt twist. Okay, I read the tutorial again, took a deep breath, and Im going to try again!

Anonymous said...

OMG It worked!!!! I Made Biscuits That Are Edible!!!!! Isnt it amazing what happens when you actually follow instructions??? Awesome!!

Brandie Skibinski said...

Yay!! I'm glad you gave it another go and they turned out great! Sometimes it's those small details that mean a whole lot to the finished product. Way to go!!

Amy Bryant said...

This is how my Grandma made them.. she also used butter but my neighbor across the street used Mayo in hers and was just as yummy.. especially with Red-eye gravy in the morning..

Anonymous said...

can I make these with gluten free flour

Anonymous said...

I just made these this morning and they are fantastic...thanks for the recipe Brandie,delicious as usual!!

Anonymous said...

My mom made biscuits very similar to these, except she used buttermilk and lard. She made the best scratch biscuits ever, and all of Nashville would back me on this statement. The Fire Dept.. would request them often. Just something she learned on her on. The other difference, and this might help those using high temp, was she would place them on the bottom rack in the oven, then take them out and place them on the top, on broil till lightly golden brown. Perfect every time! I am going to try them this way. Thanks!

tracy andrews said...

You can Get The white lily Self rising Flour at walmart

Anonymous said...

Diane Manley , im from Australia can we get white lily here ?

Ilsa Beauchamp said...

Hey! First off, I both LOVE and HATE you :D This recipe is so freaking easy that I can whip up a mess of biscuits with almost every meal (which is why I love you) but me and grain based carbs don't really get along, I eat them then they cause me to get fat, then I cry and they cry it's really just a big mess (which is why I hate you.) And now, to make matters worse, my chef mind took over last night while I was baking up another batch of biscuits to go with dinner and thought "Hey, I wonder if I could turn these into breakfast scones?" and so I did! To the flour I added 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/3 cup dried cranberries and 1 tbsp cinnamon then mixed with a fork till fully incorperated then I added the cream (I always use a fork to mix the dough) till it was forming large clumps. I tossed the whole thing on a floured surface and pressed it out to a large and thick circle (like you describe above) and then used a pizza cutter to quickly cut the circle in to 8 triangles, I then moved the whole circle triangle thing to a greased cookie sheet, covered it in melted butter and sprinkled sugar then baked it at 425 for 25 minutes and OMG these are the BEST scones (or sweet biscuits as my hubby says because we live in " 'merica!") ever!! Super moist and very satisfying :D Sorry to make you fat.

Brandie Skibinski said...

Hahaa! So funny! What a wonderful idea - love it! Thank you so much!!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing, glad I found a biscuit recipe this great. Love this recipe. So easy and quick, they turned out great. So tasty.

Rose said...

My mother never cut her biscuits out she just pinched a small piece off her dough and rolled them in her hand and then put them on her pan to bake,they were always good.My Dad had made her a long bowl out of a tree trunk for her to make her biscuits in.I know she used self rising flour but I can't remember what brand she used.

Heidi said...

Same question as someone above: what do you do with the leftover dough and what if your fire alarm is sensitive to high temps? Also has anyone tried making the biscuits and freezing the baked biscuits? I would love to have these stocked up in the freezer.

TxMomof2 said...

I've lived in the South my whole life-50 SW of Houston in a Czech community & NEVER heard of White Lily Flour until here. I actually had a hard time finding it. Some Randall's have it. There is NO substitution for this flour!!!!! Unbelievable the difference in the results. My first biscuits I used what I always used, Pillsbury. They were like hockey pucks! White Lily-my husband says " This is not the same recipe!!' Threw old flour out! White Lily is the only one I will use now. Thank you!!!!

runnergirl said...

I wanted to make biscuits and gravy for dinner tonight. I figured I'd give these biscuits a try thinking if they came out hard or tough the gravy would make up for it. I WILL NEVER AGAIN USE A DIFFERENT RECIPE FOR BISCUITS!!!! I have been using bisquik and making drop biscuits for years now because every time I made cut biscuits they came out like hockey pucks! These came out perfectly for me and on the first try at that! They even looked like yours in the picture which almost never happens. Thank you for such an awesome recipe :-)

Brandie Skibinski said...

Runnergirl, what a sweet comment! Thank you so much!! I am so happy you had success! And I really appreciate you coming back to leave a comment and let me know. You are an official Biscuit Super Star!!

Chuck said...

Brandie,
We are on low sodium diet. Can you use plain flour(only White Lily) and add baking powder and salt? Love, love your website, you always have the best recipes!

sancy18 said...

Does anyone know where you can find this brand of flour? I've never heard of it. I've looked in my local walmart but I didn't see it...

Judy K said...

I live in Texas, just north of Houston and no one sells White Lily. I ordered it from Smuckers online and got it in 3 days. I just got back from vacation in Alabama and they sell White Lily at Walmart and also in Mississippi and Louisiana. I lugged back 6 bags with me! It is in the freezer in vacuum sealed bags. Thankful I have enough for these delicious biscuits. I use parchment paper on my pans, follow all your directions exactly and they come out perfect everytime. I even through the remaining dough scraps on the cookie sheet and they are yummy with some homemade blackberry jelly. I LOVE this recipe. Thank you!!!

Melissa said...

Hi Brandie!
First time biscuit maker here. I followed your instructions to a T, or so I thought. My dough was soooo sticky! It stuck to everything and my biscuits were more like blobs than perfect circles. They tasted great. Any tips?