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Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits

These homemade Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits have all the flaky, buttery flavor of baked biscuits but they are made in an air fryer! 

A DELICIOUS HOMEMADE BISCUIT RECIPE

Did you know that you can make homemade buttermilk biscuits in the air fryer? These Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits are just as delicious as the baked version but don’t require an oven! This is yet another reason why the air fryer has become one of my new favorite kitchen appliances. It can do pretty much anything. So if you are looking for a new way to make your biscuits you need to try my Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuit recipe!

Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits on white plate.

TIPS AND TRICKS ON HOW TO MAKE AIR FRYER BUTTERMILK BISCUITS:

  • The key to this recipe is to keep the biscuit dough cold.
  • Don’t throw away your extra dough, pat it back out to make more biscuits.
  • Do not twist the biscuit cutter when making biscuits. Just press down and pull up. If you twist the cutter, the biscuits won’t rise because you’ve sealed off the edges by twisting.
  • You may need to make these in batches as you do not want to overcrowd the air fryer.
  • You can brush these with butter or even honey after they have been cooked.
  • If you don’t have buttermilk you can make your own by adding 1 cup milk + 1 Tbs white vinegar and mixing and letting sit for 5-10 minutes. There really is no perfect substitute for real buttermilk though.
  • Try serving these with some Texas Roadhouse Cinnamon Honey Butter. So good!
Collage inmate of biscuits fried, cut and being cut.

INGREDIENTS NEEDED: (FULL RECIPE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE POST)

  • all-purpose flour
  • baking powder
  • baking soda
  • sugar
  • salt
  • butter
  • buttermilk

HOW TO MAKE AIR FRYER BUTTERMILK BISCUITS:

In a large bowl add the dry ingredients.

Dry ingredients in bowl.

Whisk together until combined.

Dry ingredients being whisked in bowl.

Add the cold butter cubes.

Cubed butter added to dry ingredients.

Using a pastry cutter (or your hands) break apart the butter and work into the flour mixture until pea-sized pieces form. 

Pastry blender cutting butter into dry ingredients.

Pour the chilled buttermilk over the flour-butter mixture.

Buttermilk added to butter and flour mixture.

Mix together just until combined. Do not over mix. If the dough seems overly dry, you can add a splash more of buttermilk or if it is too wet you can add a tablespoon more of flour.

Biscuit mixture being stirred with a wooden spoon.

Add dough to a floured surface and gently pat into a disc that is about 3/4 inch thick. Use a 2-3 inch round cutter to cut into biscuits. DO NOT TWIST THE BISCUIT CUTTER. Just press down and pull up. You can take the scraps and press together to cut some additional biscuits.

Biscuits patted out and cut with biscuit cutter.

Add biscuits to the air fryer in a single layer. You may need to work in batches depending on the size of the air fryer. The biscuits should be close together. This helps them rise tall.

Cut biscuits added to air fryer basket.

Cook at 325F degrees for 13-15  minutes – or until golden brown and fluffy. Repeat with remaining biscuits, if needed.

Finished Buttermilk Biscuits in air fryer basket.

Serve with butter, honey, or your favorite jam.

Close up of Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits on white plate.

HOW TO STORE:

  • You can store these Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits at room temperature in an airtight ziptop bag or covered with foil for up to 1-2 days or in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
  • Biscuits are best when freshly baked. The longer that they sit the more stale they will get.

CRAVING MORE RECIPES?

Square image of finished Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits in air fryer

Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits

These homemade Air Fryer Buttermilk Biscuits have all the flaky, buttery flavor of baked biscuits but they are made in an air fryer! 
5 from 2 votes
Print Pin Rate
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 10

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Whisk together the dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  • Add the cold butter cubes and use a pastry cutter or your hands to break apart the butter and work into the flour mixture until pea-sized pieces form.
  • Pour the chilled buttermilk over the flour-butter mixture and mix together just until combined. Do not over mix.
  • If the dough seems overly dry, you can add a splash more of buttermilk or if it is too wet you can add a tablespoon more flour.
  • Add dough to a floured surface and gently pat into a disc that is about 3/4 inch thick.
  • Use a 2-3 inch round cutter to cut into biscuits. DO NOT TWIST THE BISCUIT CUTTER. Just press down and pull up. Twisting the biscuits will seal the biscuit edges and they won't be able to rise.
  • You can take the scraps and press together to cut some additional biscuits.
  • Add biscuits to the air fryer in a single layer, you may need to work in batches depending on the size of your air fryer. The biscuits should be close together. This helps them rise tall.
  • Cook at 325F degrees for 13-15 minutes until golden brown and fluffy.
  • Repeat with remaining biscuits, if needed
  • Serve with butter, honey, or your favorite jam.

Notes

  • The key to this recipe is to keep the biscuit dough cold.
  • Don’t throw away your extra dough, pat it back out to make more biscuits.
  • Do not twist the biscuit cutter when making biscuits. Just press down and pull up. If you twist the cutter, the biscuits won’t rise because you’ve sealed off the edges by twisting.
  • You may need to make these in batches as you do not want to overcrowd the air fryer.
  • You can brush these with butter or even honey after they have been cooked.
  • If you don’t have buttermilk you can make your own by adding 1 cup milk + 1 Tbs white vinegar and mixing and letting sit for 5-10 minutes. There really is no perfect substitute for real buttermilk though.
Course: Breads
Cuisine: American

Nutrition

Calories: 213kcal | Carbohydrates: 26g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 10g | Sodium: 316mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g

Nutritional Disclaimer

“The Country Cook” is not a dietician or nutritionist, and any nutritional information shared is an estimate. If calorie count and other nutritional values are important to you, we recommend running the ingredients through whichever online nutritional calculator you prefer. Calories and other nutritional values can vary quite a bit depending on which brands were used.

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Recipe Rating




9 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Omg! I made these in my ninja foodie, I’m not a baker by any means and these came out great! Thanks so much for the recipe!

  2. Hi, Brandie! I really want to make these awesome looking biscuits but I don’t have this type of air fryer. Mine is a Emeril Lagasse Power Air Fryer 360 Max XL  and I have never tried to cook biscuits in it. Living in the hot, sultry South I need all the cool tool conveniences I can get! What changes, if any, would I need to make?

    1. Hi Corona,

      I’m sorry I’m not familiar with every type of air fryer out there. It would be impossible to test in every single one (although it would be fun to try!) I would imagine it should work in about the same way though. Just keep an eye on them as they cook 🙂

    2. 5 stars
      If I could offer some assistance here, I used to have a basket airfryer and I now have an Instant Vortex Pro and the Kalorik Maxx 26 quart. They all pretty much function the same, but you may have to adjust the temperature a little due to the wattage variance.

      Brandie, you may want to add the wattage of your airfryer in the notes of your recipes. It might help people with questions.

      Thanks for the recipe, btw. I am saving it for future use.

      1. Thanks Donna! Unfortunately the wattage is only necessary as it pertains to how hot the temperature can go on any particular air fryer. The higher the wattage, the higher the air fryer can go in temperature. So knowing that won’t affect a temperature given in a recipe.

        The main issues people have with different air fryers is how they are shaped and the basket size. There are air fryers that are like toaster ovens now with racks. There are air fryers with drawer baskets. There is so much variety now compared to the standard original basket air fryer. So some air fryers (especially the ones with the trays like a toaster oven) may cook faster than the original basket air fryer. I only use the original standard 5 quart basket air fryer to test all my recipes as that is the most common one that the majority of everyday cooks have. 🙂